Camilla Czulada, USF Audiology Doctoral student, joins Gardner Audiology

Hi! My name is Camilla Czulada. I am a fourth-year Doctor of Audiology student at the University of South Florida and I’m completing my final year of the program at Gardner Audiology. In 2016, I earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders from James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. I was first introduced to the field of Audiology during an introduction class I took in my freshman year at JMU and became fascinated with the complexity of the ear and the process of hearing. My growing interest in the ear and hearing, along with my desire to work with patients, made Audiology the perfect fit. One area I feel strongly about is the importance of providing patients with the information necessary to take charge of their hearing health. This interest led me to study the effect of education on caregiver hearing aid knowledge as part of my Audiology doctoral project.

 

 

Over the past three years, I’ve gained experience working with patients at clinics in the greater Tampa area, including the University of South Florida Hearing Clinic and ENT practices where I furthered my knowledge in medical conditions associated with hearing loss, as well as balance testing. I am most excited to work with the adult and geriatric population at Gardner Audiology. I also look forward to working in a patient-centered practice as I know this will allow me to focus solely on guiding the patient towards better hearing.

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